Gulyas: Waldheim case helped Austria process its past

Facing up to the case of Kurt Waldheim helped Austrians process their role in the second world war, Gergely Gulyas, the head of the Prime Minister's Office, said at the book presentation on Thursday of Vince Szalay-Bobrovniczky's Austria and the Waldheim Case.

“Echoes: A Memoir Continued…” by Will Sergeant (published by Constable)

Further adventures of a Bunnyman are heaven up here

This is the motherload – well, partly. Sergeant’s first memoir in 2021 detailed his upbringing in the 1960s and 1970s outside Liverpool up to his first year as amateurish guitarist in Echo and the Bunnymen. And there, frustratingly, it ended, leaving we aficionados in ...

Exploits of the courageous on land, ice, sea and in the air

Daredevils are those brave and adventurous souls who do things the rest of us are too timid or too busy to do ourselves. We, the cautious, the couch potatoes, content ourselves with vicarious thrills as our betters climb mountains, skydive, break speed records, explore ...

“Cotton Comes To Harlem” by Chester Himes (published by Penguin Modern Classics)

Bad cop, bad cop: just another day in negro New York

Any aficionado of crime novels and films knows the “good cop, bad cop” routine, where a seething cop batters about a suspect until the accused turns to the sympathetic “good” cop for protection and spills the beans. It’s a cynical trick, of course. But ...

Thrillers get green light again

They would certainly look impressive as a set of ten on bookshelves, all with the iconic green hue that is the centrepiece of their new covers, and it should be a strong bet that buyers are in for some thumping good reads too – ...

Murder, treachery for the ages

Ten crime and espionage novels by British, American, Belgian and Japanese authors published between 1928 and 1978 are in a new series from Penguin Random House, dressed in their signature vintage look with green-and-black-and-white paperback covers, the originals of which are now very collectable, ...

"The Battle of London 1939-45" by Jerry White (published by Vintage)

Fear and fortitude under bombardment

In the almost six years of war with Germany, September 3, 1939 to May 8, 1945, London was "the greatest target in the world”, as Winston Churchill described it. The unmissable bullseye was under sustained, sometimes unrelenting, aerial bombardment by night and day. While ...

“Abbey Road” by David Hepworth (published by Penguin Books)

Classical and pop: across the great divide

Having a stroll in Nagykovacsi village recently, I walked past a house with a replica “Abbey Road” street sign on the front fence. A souvenir of a nice little trip to London, no doubt, and surely the homeowner/s took the Tube to St John’s ...

“Winkle, The Extraordinary Life of Britain’s Greatest Pilot” by Paul Beaver (published by Michael Joseph)

Air ace landed in hot and cold water

Author Paul Beaver first met famed flier Eric “Winkle” Brown in 1978, developing a close friendship that spanned almost 40 years. In 2009 Brown agreed to let Beaver write his biography with access to his archive, but with the strict caveat that it would ...

“The Angel Makers, The True Story of the Most Astonishing Murder Ring in History” by Patti McCracken (published by Mudlark)

Extrapolation mars a strong enough tale

Surprisingly, surely, “the most astonishing murder ring in history” merits a mere three lines in Wikipedia – “ Nagyrév is a village in Jasz-Nagykun-Szolnok, central Hungary. It was the location of the Nagyrév culture. Between 1914 and 1929, a small group of female villagers ...