But despite the follies relating to Brexit blues, one thing is for sure as I quote from PM Boris Johnson: “We have left the widest of rift (in the UK) of recent years behind.” OK, thank you Johnson, that was quick and easy consolation. I was sorry you caught the disease. But I am sorrier for your obsession over this Brexit “bubble” as it then took over everything else, and popped.

But before the UK abandoned the EU, to add further parody there was “Megxit”. When the media went into a frenzied spin about whether Harry and Meghan should “Carry On Royalling”. As if there was nothing else to think about despite the Syrian crisis, the Russians, global warming and general home affairs. The undercurrent of COVID-19 at that fateful time was still “a minor issue” and trivia still made news.

Then, this March, something strange happened. The world changed. Panic shopping stepped in, alongside the closure of schools and workplaces, and there was a general shutdown. Uncertainty prevailed, illness and death on an unprecedented scale took over. Bono from U2 “promised” he would deliver a song about this disease to “cheer us up”. But even this “exclusive” chestnut has disappeared – just like Brexit – from the headlines. (How about contributing a fraction of your many millions towards research into this pandemic instead, Mr. Big B?)

This is the biggest health scare in a century. We can “survive” without celebrities and tabloid trash but we cannot live without doctors, nurses, cleaners and so forth. As they diligently go about their duties in the frontline like good neighbours. They are the ones who deserve the bigger spotlight.

A month later we have death tolls in their thousands, with cities closed down and all forthcoming festivities cancelled until further notice. Eerily strange too that once not so long ago one could go to the supermarket without much care. But the issues now are, “How long are the queues? Will there be anything left on the shelves by the time I get inside?”

This way of thinking associates more with the communist era rather than the modern-day age. The same applies with walks in the park as crowds must be dispersed, should there still be any green spaces left open in the city. But at least the environment is benefitting. Finally, the larger question of all, which we have all asked, is will this plague be unwittingly passed onto anyone related to “us” individually?

It's a political crisis. Brexit, regardless of opinion, must be suspended until further notice. We have a far bigger issue, literally, on our hands. No one understood the extent of this matter and preferred to look the other way. We missed out early on, now we have to squash coronavirus. So, let's get real and prioritise what's important, as opposed to constant squabbling in Brussels. Or else life may never be the same again.


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