Fortepan is a free, curated Online Photography Archive, based in Budapest and launched in 2010. It collects pre-1990 photos. The name goes back to a Hungarian film and photo negative brand, now defunct.

The photographs are closely intertwined with Hungary’s 20th-century history and they capture the period in many ways and layers, but with a focus on the perspective of ordinary people and their experiences conveyed by private photographs, which form the backbone of the collection.

Two secondary school classmates, Miklós Tamási and Ákos Szepessy, began to collect the more than 110,000 photographs of the digital Fortepan archives back in the 1980s.

After a period of regular but haphazard collecting of discarded amateur photos and negatives in flea markets and other places, they launched an online site with 5000 digitised images in 2010.

Soon after this many private individuals and public institutions joined the circle of donors, thanks to whose pictures the archives are augmented every month.

Each photograph in the exhibition tells a story. In some lucky cases these stories can be reconstructed but in most others the people in the pictures are no longer known, and neither are the circumstances of their making, so visitors can use their imagination and invent their own stories linked to these images.

Every Past Is My Past
Hungarian National Gallery
1014 Budapest, Szent György tér 2
Open: Tuesday-Sunday 10am-6pm
Tickets: HUF 3000
See: https://en.mng.hu/
www.fortepan.hu


Loading Conversation

RELATED POSTS
The news that made headlines

The Brief History of the Week

Geschrieben von BT

Presenting in one concise package the week’s most important and fascinating national stories,…

ComiX Coffee in District V

Inmates running the asylum?

Geschrieben von Attila Leitner

Briton Ben Innes became the very definition of cool on Tuesday. In case you missed this, the…

Protests, no apologies as government-teachers dispute widens

Fight of the roundtables

Geschrieben von BT

The civil public education platform representing the teachers’ movement, which calls itself an…